Suspect in attack at U.S. Capitol went from jock to posting about paranoia, extremist groups

Suspect in attack at U.S. Capitol went from jock to posting about paranoia, extremist groups

WASHINGTON — The man who police say rammed his car into a security barrier at the U.S. Capitol on Friday and was fatally shot by police after emerging from the vehicle with a knife was a lifelong athlete who in recent months had shown growing support on social media for Louis Farrakhan and the extremist Nation of Islam group. 

Noah Green, 25, was identified as the suspect in the attack that killed one U.S. Capitol Police officer and injured another, according to a law enforcement official briefed on the inquiry. Those who knew Green described him as quiet, athletic and non-violent but also told USA TODAY they were concerned about recent changes in his behavior.

Police say Green rammed a dark-colored sedan into a security barrier outside the U.S. Capitol, killing Officer William “Billy” Evans, an 18-year veteran of the U.S. Capitol Police Department. After the crash, police say, Green got out of the car with a knife in his hand, ran toward officers and ignored their commands. Officers opened fire and killed him.

D.C. Metropolitan Police Chief Robert J. Contee III said Green’s attack did not “appear to be terrorism-related.”

Contee said police are investigating to determine Green’s motive. He said Green was not known to either D.C. Police or the USCP and was not previously considered a threat to lawmakers.

More:Officer William Evans, killed in Friday’s attack at Capitol, described as ‘wonderful guy’

People who went to school with Green and played sports with him growing up described him as the average jock: athletic, popular, even working at a gym in college.

The violence on Friday, they say, was jarring compared to the person they knew, but Green’s recent social media activity seemed to offer clues that he’d changed.

Green was born in West Virginia but spent most of his life growing up in a sparsely populated area of Virginia with a large family, including nine siblings, USA TODAY learned through multiple interviews. He was athletic, playing basketball and football growing up.

He graduated from Christopher Newport University in 2019, where he played football as a defensive back, a spokesman for the school in Newport News, Virginia, told USA TODAY. On his biography page for the team, Green noted he was majoring in business and the “person in history he’d most like to meet is Malcolm X.”

Andre Toran, who was a captain on the football team at the time, said Green was a “really quiet guy” who would crack jokes every once in a while but usually just smiled instead of chiming in on conversations.

“I know people say this all the time, but the guy who I played with is not the same person who did this,” said Toran, a reporter at the Courier-Journal in Louisville, Kentucky, part of the USA TODAY Network.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *